It's a ripple effect!

"A thousand mile journey begins with one step"

Archive for the ‘Social Justice’ Category

We’re in Dr. Simone’s House

leave a comment »

Click for the rest of our Dr. Simone's pics.

Organization: Dr. Simone’s Canadian Food for Children (CFFC)

Date: May 31, 2011

Location:1258 Lakeshore Road East,Mississauga,Ontario

Facilitator: Mike Slynn, Volunteer Coordinator

About the Organization: In 1985, Dr. Simone and his wife founded Canadian Food for Children following a rendezvous with Mother Teresa that made them “discover their true purpose in life” and that is to help provide for the less fortunate children. CFFC has shipped million pounds of good to developing countries around the world. They operate on a volunteer basis, no one gets paid, and it is all for non-profit.

Tasks: I swept the floor of the warehouse with Nicole and I took out the garbage.

            The Ministry of Health periodically checks in to see the cleanliness of the warehouse. By helping keep the place immaculately clean, I make the place a healthier place to operate in for the volunteers and keep the food donated goods free from dirt and contamination.

To volunteer at a warehouse setting is a different experience compared to what we have done with the Good Shepherd, Scott Mission and Daily Bread Food bank. We got to see the mounts of goods that are shipped to third world countries around the world. We think that is a lot but it is still not enough. So, that gives us perspective how unfortunate the conditions these countries live in. We have to give more than what we already provide. We have to continue to help them build up and hopefully they can stand on their own in the future.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Written by Elvin Madamba

June 6, 2011 at 11:37 PM

We’re Taking Over

leave a comment »

Click for the rest of our SAGE pics.

Organization: Students for the Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship (SAGE)

Date: May 28, 2011 (Date of presentation)

Location: Ryerson University (245 Church St.,Toronto,Ontario)

Facilitator: Alexandra Nguyen, National Coordinator

About the Organization: SAGE is a network of high school students from all over the world that are all interested in entrepreneurship while making a difference in the world. It fosters creative and innovative projects “that impact schools and communities”. Students are given a chance to develop their network and skills in the business trade. Student groups that are a part of SAGE compete annually on national and international level showcasing initiatives and successes.

            As a part of SAGE Canada, our class was tasked to exhibit our projects from our leadership program while competing for national honors. So, we picked our two main projects for the semester – the community orchard and our Costa Rica mission.

Nicole, Nigel and Rapha practiced their speeches for days, Donita and I worked on the visual presentation aspect. Sofia worked on the annual report with the help of Sarah. Tom was jumping all over the place, helping out with every facet.

We stayed at Delta Chelsea the night before the presentation date, so we got some more polishing of our presentation.

The next day was presentation day, and all of us were very anxious but ready to go. So, we did and we just absolutely destroyed it. I think we did pretty well, considering we only won three national awards (overall champion, most socially responsible and best social enterprise). Boasting aside, we are very proud of our achievement, we worked so hard to get to where we are. Add to the fact that we have only been together for a semester and to win three awards, it is truly amazing. We have definitely showed everybody that a small group can make a difference by being really passionate for it, and it definitely showed. Our projects are very ambitious that it impacts society and the environment positively. To be quite honest, our aim was mostly to showcase, to let people know we exist and we are doing these awesome things locally and internationally. Winning was the cherry on top, and we gladly took that.

We do not stop here though; we are always continuing to make strides by continuing our volunteer initiatives and making progress in our main projects.

We are set to compete on the international level in Buffalo, NY, USA the coming month of July. We are excited and hope to take that international trophy home.

Written by Elvin Madamba

June 6, 2011 at 11:34 PM

Tending Sheep, the Third Installment

with 2 comments

Click for the rest of our Good Shepherd pics.

Organization: The Good Shepherd

Date: May 13, 2011

Location: 412 Queen Street East,Toronto

Facilitator: Rebecca Ferguson, Fundraising, Events and Resources Coordinator

About the Organization: The Good Shepherd Ministries was founded by “Br. Mathias Barrett, an Irish-born Catholic with a passion for serving the poor” in 1955 inNew Mexico. The Good Shepherd is named after the stories of the good shepherd, Jesus Christ and His compassionate stature. The Little Brothers of the Good Shepherd operates based upon Jesus’ love and care. The ministry grew and found missions in England, Ireland, Haiti and of course, Canada. In 1963,Toronto’s Archbishop Pocock invited the Little Brothers to open a refuge for the poor and needy. The Good Shepherd Centre opened at Queen Street East, “a historically poor area in Toronto”. Today, the Good Shepherd besides providing food, clothes and shelter, also aid deprived people get back to their lives through several programs. Some of these programs include, drug rehabilitation programs (DARE) and house resettlement plans. The Good Shepherd is guided by the teachings of Jesus Christ and is “a leading provider of comprehensive services to homeless, disadvantaged and marginalized people”. The Ministry operates thanks to its staff and many volunteers.”

Tasks: In our third trip to the Good Shepherd, we sorted out toiletries (soap, shampoo, conditioner, lotion, toilet paper, etc.) and made beds.

            In our past trips, we have learned the importance of serving the poor food as they battle starvation. This time, we learned the significance of people’s other basic needs such as cleanliness and shelter. The toiletries we sorted are used directly by Good Shepherd patrons for their personal hygiene and health (you know what they say, cleanliness is next to godliness). In making the beds, we ready the beds for the patrons to sleep on (these people have no place to stay for the night). Also, by making the beds we let the Good Shepherd patrons know that we value their dignity.

Written by Elvin Madamba

June 6, 2011 at 11:17 PM

Not Noah’s Arc but Jean’s

leave a comment »

Organization: L’arche Daybreak

Date: May 5, 2011

Location: 11339 Yonge Street,Richmond Hill

Facilitator: Toni Urbanski, Volunteer Coordinator

About the Organization: L’arche was spearheaded by Canadian humanitarian Jean Vanier when he invited two intellectually disabled people to live with him in aFrenchVillage in 1964. They named their house “L’arche” which means “the Ark” in French. Soon, L’arche was growing, not only inviting more intellectually disable men and women but also volunteers that would care for them. L’arche has spread through outNorth America and the world. L’arche was founded by Steve and Ann Newroth in 1969. It is the largest L’arche community in North America. The fundamental principle of L’arche is “that we are all people with handicaps, and gifts, and that our lives are enriched when we dare to live and work with people of difference”.

Tasks: I picked up litter with Donita and Mr. Neil around the perimeter of the site. By picking up litter, we have contributed to the general cleanliness of the L’arche house. Giving ‘core members’, volunteers, and staff a much cleaner environment to operate in.

            Our trip to the L’arche community was pretty unique. It opened my eyes to a different perspective about disabled people. They are not really any different from us. They are people too, and they are capable of doing things as well. I even found them to be quite friendly and very interesting people. I have found a concrete reason to really respect them. They deserve every little bit of dignity and respect we have, as well.

Written by Elvin Madamba

June 6, 2011 at 11:14 PM

Posted in Events, Social Justice

Tagged with , ,

Tending Sheep, Part Deux

leave a comment »

Trying to look good before the day starts (click for the rest of the pictures)

Organization: The Good Shepherd

Date: April 21, 2011

Location:412 Queen Street East,Toronto

Facilitator: Rebecca Ferguson, Fundraising, Events and Resources Coordinator

About the Organization: “The Good Shepherd Ministries was founded by “Br. Mathias Barrett, an Irish-born Catholic with a passion for serving the poor” in 1955 in New Mexico. The Good Shepherd is named after the stories of the good shepherd, Jesus Christ and His compassionate stature. The Little Brothers of the Good Shepherd operates based upon Jesus’ love and care. The ministry grew and found missions in England,Ireland,Haiti and of course,Canada. In 1963,Toronto’s Archbishop Pocock invited the Little Brothers to open a refuge for the poor and needy. The Good Shepherd Centre opened at Queen Street East, “a historically poor area inToronto”. Today, the Good Shepherd besides providing food, clothes and shelter, also aid deprived people get back to their lives through several programs. Some of these programs include, drug rehabilitation programs (DARE) and house resettlement plans. The Good Shepherd is guided by the teachings of Jesus Christ and is “a leading provider of comprehensive services to homeless, disadvantaged and marginalized people”. The Ministry operates thanks to its staff and many volunteers.”

Tasks: Work in the kitchen, cut vegetables and serve lunch

This is our second time back at the Good Shepherd; last time, I had prepared food too but this time around I also served food. Nothing changed in our objective, but this time we have greater understanding while we serve the people that are in need with the dignity and respect they deserve and help them get back on their feet to live their lives fully.

It is truly remarkable to keep giving your time to help other people out. It is a different feeling; it is I think what true happiness is all about. We can never really be happy until we share our fortunes with others. To see other people happy as I serve them, it makes me happy too. It gives me hope that organizations like the Good Shepherd do what they do, we rebuild other people’s lives and I think that is just simply amazing.

Written by Elvin Madamba

May 15, 2011 at 8:01 PM

Posted in Events, Social Justice

Tagged with

It’s a Treat Patrol!

leave a comment »

It’s a Treat Patrol!

Organization: Office of the Catholic Youth

Date: April 8, 2011

Location: Streets of DowntownToronto

Facilitator: Dean Penafiel, Assisstant Program Coordinator

About the Organization: The Office of Catholic Youth (OCY) serves youth in the Archdiocese of Toronto. They have developed the “3 C’s” that serve as guiding principles for the work they do. The “3 C’s” stand for Celebrating “life, faith and the many diverse gifts of young”, Connecting “them more deeply to God and to one another, becoming the Church of tomorrow while being the Church of today” and Commissioning “them to go make a difference by putting their faith into action and making Jesus Christ’s mission their own”.

We prepared 80 plus lunches (chicken, tuna, cheese and ham sandwiches with drinks and cookies) and the following day we went on a patrol on the homeless/poverty heavy streets of Toronto and handed out the lunch bags.

The Good Shepherd, the Scott Mission and the Daily Bread Foodbank provide food for the less fortunate people. Similarly, we handed out lunches to the homeless, poor and hungry people of downtown Toronto in collaboration with the Office of Catholic Youth. We took a different approach this time around; we were on the streets, we came to the people. We really got to see how tough living on the streets is. It added another dimension to what we know about homelessness and poverty (You’d be surprised how ‘normal’ these people looked, you could’ve sworn they were middle class). We continue to learn about the difficulties of such circumstances and how it is needed for people, for youth especially, to continue to be empathetic and active on these issues.

We have a house to live in, food to eat, and clothes to wear, let us not be selfish and share our blessings. We gave a meal’s worth of food, it may not be a lot, but to the people we gave them to, it could very well be a matter of life and death. These are small acts of kindness but let us look at the big picture. As I have previously mentioned, these small acts, well, they pile up and they can be of significant change. Working with youth oriented groups give me a sense of security, I know that there are youth out there that are interested in making a difference. When we all collaborate, we can definitely tackle the world’s greatest issues but we have to start small and locally. By doing what we did, we pave a way to a future that is interested in eradicating poverty, homelessness and hunger. Four different organizations now, all interested in eliminating these issues. Despite how our future is portrayed, how we are all ‘screwed’, I believe, I put faith that there is a rainbow after the storm.

Written by Elvin Madamba

May 15, 2011 at 7:34 PM

Posted in Events, Social Justice

Tagged with

“The mission at Scott Mission” by Nicole Maylor

leave a comment »

Young humanitarians in action!

February 25, 2011

N.  MAYLOR

TORONTO, Ontario

The students of the Humanitarian Experiential Leadership Program took on a mission at the Scott Mission serving the homeless and people in need.

“ When we walked through the doors everyone seemed very friendly!” Said Sofia Becerra before the day began.

The students are involved in a number of humanitarian activities but they are very passionate about helping the homeless. They did a number of tasks that day that impacted the lives of others in a greater way then they could ever imagine.

Many students had smiles on their faces throughout the day, loving what they were doing.

“The Scott Mission is a place you can count on for the simplest of things” Said Sarah Smibert, a student in the program.e

All of the students passionately believed in the change they were making and came together to make that change as a team when they divided up the tasks of the day.

The day consisted of helping out in the day care, preparing meals for the homeless, serving meals for the homeless, and cleaning up afterwards.

“I enjoyed being able to spend time serving people.” Said Sofia Becerra at the end of a long day’s work.

The students understood the meaning of the word poverty that day through the different people that came into the Scott Mission for support. Seeing all types of people from all different walks of life really put things in perspective. I was an insightful day for an egar class of students ready to help.

 

Written by Elvin Madamba

April 8, 2011 at 2:26 PM

%d bloggers like this: